Young Adult

/Young Adult

Review: Second Rate Posse by Lola Beverly Hills

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Title: Second Rate Posse
Author: Lola Beverly Hills
Cover Artist: Lola Beverly Hills
Publisher: Self-Published
Reviewer: Sean
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Romance
Pairing: Heterosexual
Length: Novel
Heat Rating1 Stars
Book Rating4 Stars (4 / 5)

This book was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review


Blurb:

Jada Williams wants to be the black Regina George, having her own set of fabulous friends that garner the most attention out of any posse they pass through the halls of Melrose High. Too bad Crystal and Junebug, her best friends since her sandbox days, would rather spend their weekends in front of Nat Geo Wild than house party hop like normal fifteen year olds. She can’t win the affections of Benjamin Banks if her posse can’t compete with the certified mean girl, KiKi Horn. When KiKi and her shameless friends, Habiba and Roxanne, take Melrose by storm, Jada becomes caught up in the competition, stopping at nothing to win. If it means paying dust to her longtime friends who can’t keep up, so be it. Jada will win the affection she’s been fighting for, but what will be her next move when it comes from someone she least expected?


Review:

Second Rate Posse was entertaining. It took me a couple chapters to be able to connected to the characters. Once I got connected to them, I really enjoyed the novel a lot. It reminded me of Mean Girls film in some way. It was a girl who wanted to be popular in her high school. Which means she had to find herself a hottest boy and be surrounded by popular people. Of course, she had a rival who wanted the same as her. Jada was annoying at first but eventually I grew onto her. Crystal was my favorite character. Imani was a hilarious character but she cared about her own friends deeply.

Benjamin was an interesting person, but he wasn’t a people person. He was the one Jada and Kiki fought for. Jada really picked the wrong guy since I could totally hand picked a right guy for her. But again, being popular infested her brain. It made the book much more entertaining and had me chuckled a couple times.

It loses a star because there were some words that were overused. Matter-of-factly for example. It was starting to get annoying to see that word being used over and over. Although, it didn’t entirely ruined the novel.

Overall, it was a good read and I can easily recommended to anyone who want to read something light and had some humor in it. I really hope the author will write at least one more book about them. I wanted to see if Jada eventually go with the guy I thought was perfect for her.

August 24th, 2015|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: The Ravens Crossing Book Two by Three Authors

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Title: The Raven Crossing Book Two (The Raven Crossing, )
Author: Amanda Corlies, Andi Lea, and West Thornhill
Cover Artist: Andi Lea
Publisher: Self-Published
Reviewer: Sean
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Romance
Pairing: Bisexual, Gay, Lesbian, & Heterosexual
Length: Long Novel
Heat Rating2 Stars
Book Rating3.5 Stars (3.5 / 5)

This book was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review


Blurb:

This is the second book in The Ravens Crossing series.
Previous book: The Raven Crossing: Book One
Next book: The Raven Crossing: Book Two

The Ravens Crossing is a serialized LGBTQ and straight ally young adult series. It is a paranormal/science fiction/fantasy adventure. TRC is written by three authors sharing a world. Books One, Two, and Three follow the adventures of thirteen high school friends. This volume contains Season Two stories in the order they were originally published at the companion website www.theravenscrossing.org.

***

Welcome back to Wildwood, where keeping secrets has become a way of life. Because being a Gaea is nothing if not complicated. But, when thirteen high school seniors come into their full powers as Earth, Air, Water, Fire, and Time Gaeas, they begin to uncover a depth of deception surrounding them that may tear some of them apart. The secrets revealed will shake them to their very foundations, and just when these friends need to trust each other the most, they will end up keeping secrets from each other.

With Gaea abilities that range from astral projection to firestarting to time travel and a whole lot in between, the Thirteen must learn to protect themselves. They should be focused on college acceptance letters, but planning for their future involves Armors teaching them martial arts and swordplay. Instead of learning from a history text, they are learning the intricacies of time travel from a legendary eccentric named Amyntas. With each discovery, from Gaea genetics to ancient prophecies, to what it means to become bonded as a Tempus and Solus, the stakes get higher. Because Frederick Demetrius, Donna Holden, and a mysterious man named Jiro seem fixated on Wildwood. They want something from the Thirteen, and they don’t mind taking out anyone who stands in their way.


Review:

It took me over a year to finish the book. All in all, it’s a good book, but it was too long for my taste. There are a lot of scenes that can be easily cut off from the book and shorten it a bit. For example, one scene was repeated a few times from different POV and I got tired of reading the similar scene. I loved the characters the authors created for this world. They have gone through tough times, especially for their ages. As soon as the book ended, it left me with nothing to be honest. I thought they’d encountered something crazy with Frederick, Donna, and Jiro, but I guess I’ll need to check the third book out when I can. It’s longer than book three, so I’ll still get it and read as often as I can until I finish the book. I know it wasn’t the best review I’ve yet to write. The book basically left me exhausted and speechless. If you have plenty of time, the series is worth a checking out. The abilities the characters had were brilliant and I loved the type of powers the authors created for them.

June 17th, 2015|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: The Adventures of Monkey Girl and Tiger Kite by Kai Schalk

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Title: The Adventures of Monkey Girl and Tiger Kite
Author: Kai Schalk
Cover Artist: Aisha Akeju
Publisher: Less Than Three Press
Reviewer: Monika
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Non-Romance
Pairing: Lesbian
Length: Novelette
Heat Rating1 Stars
Book Rating3 Stars (3 / 5)

This book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review


Blurb:

High school would be a lot easier to deal with if Sunny Wong did not have to balance schoolwork with superhero shenanigans. But superhero she is, gifted the powers of Chinese folk hero Monkey, and when zombies start appearing it’s up to her and her sidekick, Delia, to figure out who’s responsible for raising the dead and why…


Review:

This is a cute little novelette about Super Heroes and Zombies. I really liked the premise it’s a good one; someone is raising the undead and Sunny with her friend Delia take on the challenge of finding out who is doing it. I also really liked Sunny’s character she kicks butt and she has a fun and snarky personality. Although Delia is Sunny’s best friend and her secret crush Delia has very little to do with the story.

There was a lot going on, perhaps too much, causing the story to feel rushed and not exactly what I was expecting. I wasn’t expecting a romance but I did think there would be more to Sunny and Delia’s relationship or non-relationship. When Sunny gets up the courage to tell Delia about her crush on her Delia all but ignores it. It left me with questions that never got answered. Did Delia deliberately ignore Sunny and if so why? Is that just Delia’s personality, kind of nonchalant and not too serious or did it Sunny’s feelings frighten her? With Delia not being in the story very much it was next to impossible to get into her head.

Perfect set-up if there are plans for a sequel and if there is then YAY! I did enjoy reading it but as a stand-a-lone too much is unanswered or missing to feel really complete.

March 31st, 2015|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: The Adventures of Monkey Girl and Tiger Kite by Kai Schalk

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Title: The Adventures of Monkey Girl and Tiger Kite
Author: Kai Schalk
Cover Artist: Aisha Akeju
Publisher: Less Than Three Press
Reviewer: Monika
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Non-Romance
Pairing: Lesbian
Length: Novelette
Heat Rating1 Stars
Book Rating3 Stars (3 / 5)

This book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review


Blurb:

High school would be a lot easier to deal with if Sunny Wong did not have to balance schoolwork with superhero shenanigans. But superhero she is, gifted the powers of Chinese folk hero Monkey, and when zombies start appearing it’s up to her and her sidekick, Delia, to figure out who’s responsible for raising the dead and why…


Review:

This is a cute little novelette about Super Heroes and Zombies. I really liked the premise it’s a good one; someone is raising the undead and Sunny with her friend Delia take on the challenge of finding out who is doing it. I also really liked Sunny’s character she kicks butt and she has a fun and snarky personality. Although Delia is Sunny’s best friend and her secret crush Delia has very little to do with the story.

There was a lot going on, perhaps too much, causing the story to feel rushed and not exactly what I was expecting. I wasn’t expecting a romance but I did think there would be more to Sunny and Delia’s relationship or non-relationship. When Sunny gets up the courage to tell Delia about her crush on her Delia all but ignores it. It left me with questions that never got answered. Did Delia deliberately ignore Sunny and if so why? Is that just Delia’s personality, kind of nonchalant and not too serious or did it Sunny’s feelings frighten her? With Delia not being in the story very much it was next to impossible to get into her head.

Perfect set-up if there are plans for a sequel and if there is then YAY! I did enjoy reading it but as a stand-alone too much is unanswered or missing to feel really complete.

March 2nd, 2015|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: When Ryan Came Back by Devon McCormack

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Title: When Ryan Came Back
Author: Devon McCormack
Cover Artist: Aaron Anderson
Publisher: Harmony Ink Press
Reviewer: Monika
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Romance
Pairing: Gay
Length: Novel
Heat Rating2 Stars
Book Rating3 Stars (3 / 5)

This book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review


Blurb:

Steven’s life changes forever the day he discovers his childhood friend and lifelong crush, Ryan Walters, standing in his bedroom. The problem? Ryan Walters committed suicide just days earlier.

Ryan tells Steven that he didn’t kill himself. He believes he was murdered and that his death is linked to an article he was working on for the school paper. Steven sets out to solve the mystery, but as the story unfolds, so does Ryan’s secret life of sex with guys and depression. Steven realizes suicide is more plausible than Ryan’s conspiracy theory, but he struggles to convince Ryan of the real cause of his death. And despite revelations of his friend’s closeted life, he must face the truth that Ryan doesn’t—and never will—love him.


Review:

This book is a difficult one to review; while some of it worked there were things that just didn’t hit the mark. The main characters were sweet, it had some humorous moments that had me chuckling, there were moments I wanted to reach for a tissue and for the most part the mystery was okay. With that said this should have been a winner for me, unfortunately it wasn’t. I didn’t dislike the story, far from it, but I couldn’t fall in love with it either.

I like the characters and even though I thought they were sweet I never felt any connection to them or the story. All the while I was reading I kept wishing that Ryan wasn’t a ghost and that he and Steven could share the excitement of first love but if that were the case there wouldn’t have been any need for the mystery. A ghost and his friend investigating who killed him could have been a great story but the mystery in a mystery was too much. The conclusion to who killed Ryan was a surprise to me I never saw that coming but the other mystery, which I can’t say anything about or it would be a big spoiler, was predictable.

I think this story could work for a lot of readers, for me there just needed to be more.

February 16th, 2015|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Memories of Forgotten Love by Cheryl Headford

Title: Memories of Forgotten Love
Author: Cheryl Headford
Cover Artist: Deana C. Jamroz
Publisher: Featherweight Press
Reviewer: Sean
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Romance
Pairing: Gay
Length: Novel
Heat Rating1 Stars
Book Rating4 Stars (4 / 5)

 


Blurb:

After waking from a coma, Noah discovers that memories are tricky things and sometimes blissful ignorance isn’t such a bad thing.

Noah wakes from a coma with no memory of who he is. As his memories return they become stranger and more sinister at every turn. He begins to suspect the accident in which he was injured wasn’t an accident at all, and refuses to accept what everyone is saying – that he threw himself off his balcony in a suicide attempt. It just doesn’t feel like something he would do. Struggling to come to terms with the shocking story he gradually uncovers, he’s helped by his friends. Yet, his best friend, Luke is acting strangely, leaving Noah to wonder just what exactly he isn’t telling him.


Review:

The blurb caught my attention so easy I accepted the review request without any hesitation. The book didn’t disappoint me at all. I enjoyed from the beginning to the ending. The ending, on other hand, was okay. The author could’ve done better than that. A young gentleman woke up from a coma after being under for nearly a year and he had no memories at all. It was a great start of a novel where I got to watch how Noah dealt with the memories loss and being surround by his friends and families. He actually didn’t remember any of them. But it took a while for him to get it all back. Once he discovered the dark secret everyone was hiding from him, the world changed for him.

I was a bit annoying where everyone refused to tell him what caused him being in coma. I believe that every patient had a right to know what happened to this person. I found that situation a bit sticky and I honestly doubt doctors would withhold that kind of information. It really didn’t make any sense but as I ignore that little issue, I was able to enjoy the novel as is. I was surprised that I didn’t figure out who did that to Noah, but I already knew whether he actually did commit a suicide or not. It wasn’t that difficult to figure it out.

The pairing between Luke and Noah was so perfect for each other. It did make me feel a bit frustrated when Luke refused to tell Noah what the hell was going on until the dark secrets got out…I understood why Luke refused to say anything about it. I was just glad Noah was able to recovered his memories all back on his own and able to deal it as best as he could.

Writing this type of review was a bit challenge because I had to be careful to not spoil anything about the novel, but I can tell you that it’ll worth your time to check the novel out. I found it to be a good written young adult novel with a good amount of mystery.

January 29th, 2015|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Most Beautiful Words by Raine O’Tierney

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Title: Most Beautiful Words
Author: Raine O'Tierney
Cover Artist: Brooke Albrecht
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press
Reviewer: Jay
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Romance
Pairing: Gay
Length: Novel
Heat Rating2 Stars
Book Rating4.5 Stars (4.5 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Twelve-year-old Autumn’s world is shattered when her beloved Great-Pop, Tommy Johnson, suffers a stroke that leaves him comatose. With everyone around her resigning themselves to the inevitable, Autumn is the only one not willing to give up. She and Great-Pop have more secret stories to share with each other, after all. More stories about Roy McMillan—the great love of Tommy’s life whom he lost fifty years ago.  

Autumn struggles to keep Great-Pop on this side of death’s door. But how can she compete with the beautiful and mysterious Valley—a place of surreal magic where the sun never fully sets? Especially when there’s someone familiar in the Valley who will do everything he can to keep Great-Pop from returning to her.


Review:

Most Beautiful Words combines present and past with a fantasy afterlife. It is a beautiful bittersweet story told primarily through the eyes of a 12 year old girl. Autumn loves her great grandfather (Great-Pop) Tommy Johnson. Great-Pop has shared many stories with Autumn including the ones about his only true love Roy McMillian whom he lost 50 years ago. 

When Great-Pop suffers a stroke that leaves him comatose Autumn is not ready to let him go. Here the author takes us from the present to reveal the past though stories and then to a fantasy afterlife where a battle ensues. I will admit that at first I was confused by the unusual way the story was told. However, once I caught onto the technique and understood that all three realities were the same characters, I fell in love with the story and the way in which it was being told to me.

In present day Autumn is struggling to hang on to Great-Pop. She is an inexperienced 12 year old girl so her selfishness is understandable and even expected. In the past we learn of Tommy and Roy’s relationship and the love they shared if only for a brief time. In the Fantasy afterlife we see the struggles Autumn, Tommy, and Roy are dealing with. We witness the battle raging within themselves and between each other. Raine O’Tierney does a masterful job of intertwining these three realities to unfold a story of love on so many levels.

This story contains so much that no review will do it justice. The love between a granddaughter and her grandfather. The love of two men in a time when it had to be kept secret. The love between a man and a woman that were really best friends. We are reminded that true love never goes away, that love is complex, and of the heartfelt struggles surrounding letting go. This one will stick with you long after the last page is turned and you have shed many tears of sadness and joy.  

November 11th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Temptation University (Audiobook) by Mark A. Roeder

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Title: temptation University (Gay Youth Chronicles, #10)
Author: Mark A. Roeder
Narrator: Robert G. Davis
Cover Artist: Ken Clark
Publisher: Self-Published
Reviewer: Jay
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Romance
Pairing: Gay
Length: Long Novel (10 Hours and 38 Minutes)
Heat Rating2 Stars
Book Rating4 Stars (4 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Brendan is beginning his college football career at Indiana University in Bloomington, but his relationship with his high-school-age boyfriend, Casper, is strained. Brendan knew parting from Casper would be tough, but he didn’t count on the temptations of a major Midwestern university. He’s surrounded by hot young men and the hottest of them all is his very own teammate and the quarterback of the IU football team, Gabrial Diaddio. Brendan knows he’s in trouble the moment his eyes fall on Gabrial. When Gabrial begins to pursue him, Brendan’s troubles only deepen and he begins to wonder if he should keep up his long distance relationship with Casper or free himself to explore the sexy, college boys who surround and entice him.

Marc is bold, openly gay, and still in high school, but when he meets Dorian his confidence in his ability to be himself is shaken. Marc is a skater and soccer jock. Dorian is incredibly sexy and cute, but he’s also stereotypically gay. Marc finds himself drawn to Dorian, but when Marc’s team-mates give him a hard time about his new “girlfriend” he has second thoughts. Should he suffer the taunts and ridicule of his teammates or push Dorian away to protect his reputation as a jock?


Review:

Temptation University continues Mark A. Roeder’s Gay Youth Chronicles. I am particularly fond of Brendan and Casper whom I met while listening to A Better Place – Gay Youth Chronicles #6. Brendan Brewer is graduating from high school in small town Verona, Indiana as part of the class of 1982. Brendan was top dog on his high school football team and openly gay. His boyfriend, Casper, is two years behind Brendan and therefore will remain in high school. Brendan decides to attend Indiana University in Bloomington where he knows he will be a small fish on the football team.

This tale follows the lives of Brendan at IU and Casper back at VHS. Brendan and Casper have a deep love for each other but will it withstand the distance and time apart? Brendan is surrounded by good looking young men and the IU quarterback Gabrial Diaddio catches his attention. Brendan begins to doubt himself and the strength of his relationship with Casper. Back at the Shelby farm in Verona we are brought into Marc and Dorian’s relationship and the insecurities Marc succumbs to because of Dorian’s more effeminate nature. However, Casper is there to help Marc and Dorian figure things out. 

The story is about young love and learning ones path in life. Brendan and Casper are lucky in that they have accepted their sexuality. Here they work through what love really means. They realize the difference between lust and love and determine the type of men they want to be. This story does look at temptation from multiple angles and in the end wraps things up well while leaving room for more to Brendan and Casper’s story. I have to admit I did find the acceptance of gays out of sync for the time-frame of the book. Maybe I was projecting what I felt as a closeted gay man in the 80’s into my comprehension of the story.

This review is based on the audio book version:
Narrator: Robert G. Davis
Length: 10 hours & 38 minutes
Narration: While Robert G. Davis’ narration was okay it didn’t work as well as I would have liked. It is hard to put my finger on exactly why, so I am going to chalk it up to and incompatibility with my preferences.

October 13th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Tales From Foster High (Audiobook) by John Goode

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Title: Tales From Foster High
Author: John Goode
Narrator: Michael Stellman
Cover Artist: Paul Richmond
Publisher: Harmony Ink Press
Reviewer: Jay
Genre: Young Adult
Type: Romance
Pairing: Gay & Questioning
Length: Novel (7 Hours and 17 Minutes)
Heat Rating3 Stars
Book Rating5 Stars (5 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Kyle Stilleno is the invisible student, toiling through high school in the middle of Nowhere, Texas. Brad Greymark is the baseball star of Foster High. When they bond over their mutual damage during a night of history tutoring, Kyle thinks maybe his life has changed for good. But the promise of fairy-tale love is a lie when you’re gay and falling for the most popular boy in school. A coming of age story in the same vein of John Hughes, Tales from Foster High shows an unflinching vision of the ups and downs of teenage love and what it is like to grow up gay.


Review:

Tales from Foster High is a beautiful yet angsty coming of age and coming out story. Kyle Stilleno and Brad Greymark have family issues to deal with, but the struggles and self-acceptance they went though was realistic, heartbreaking, and heartwarming. This story looks at the issues one still faces today as an LGBT youth. It is a shame that these guys had to endure anything negative for choosing to love one another. The teenage years are traumatic enough without the added pressures placed on young adults for coming out. Their story is told very well without shying away from the issues nor the attraction that they feel.

Kyle is the intelligent and socially awkward loner in school with and abusive alcoholic mother. His goal is to make it through high school unnoticed. Brad is popular, good looking, and a star on the baseball team whose parents are in a loveless marriage. Brad asking Kyle to tutor him in history becomes the catalyst that changes both young men forever. Some might call it cliché that the nerd and the jock fall for each other. I found this story line amazing. While these two young men struggle with the repercussions of coming out and choosing to love each other they also realized what will happen to them if they deny their feelings. 

I enjoyed the way the story was told from each guy’s perspective to show us what was going with each of them. Being a young adult story the interaction between these young men is not as graphic as most M/M romance but is appropriate for their age and experience. The emotions shared by these guys was beautiful and watching them grow as the story developed was touching. The secondary characters added to the believability of the story and although you want to dislike some of them for their actions you just can’t.

Tales from Foster High is the combination of these three short stories that flows as one:
• Maybe With a Chance of Certainty – Kyle’s perspective
• The End of the Beginning – Brad’s perspective
• Raise Your Glass – Kyle and Brad

This review is based on the audio book version:
Narrator: Michael Stellman
Length: 7 hours & 17 minutes
Narration: Michael Stellman did a wonderful job with the pronunciation and tone of his narration for Tales from Foster High. You understood completely that the characters young adults. Well done!

July 11th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: The Battle for Jericho (Audiobook Version) by Gene Gant

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Title: The Battle for Jericho
Author: Gene Gant
Narrator: Paul Morey
Cover Artist: Anne Cain
Publisher: Harmony Ink Press
Reviewer: Jay
Genre: Contemporary
Type: Romance
Pairing: Gay, Heterosexual, Questioning, & Undecided
Length: Novel (7 Hours and 48 Minutes)
Heat Rating2 Stars
Book Rating4 Stars (4 / 5)

 


Blurb:

A battle is brewing in the conservative little town of Webster’s Glen. Gay activist Dylan Cussler stirs up the establishment when he moves in with his boyfriend and sues the state over its gay adoption ban. Sixteen-year-old Jericho Jiles and his best friend, Mac Travis, decide to do their bit to convince Dylan and his boyfriend to leave town. But when Dylan turns up before they can finish trashing his house, Jericho panics, leaving Dylan unconscious and wounded. 

Drowning in guilt, Jericho returns to Dylan’s home to make amends. He is surprised when Dylan forgives him and opens his eyes to the world around him. Soon Jericho comes to a life-changing realization: he is attracted to boys as well as girls. That’s a problem, considering Jericho has a girlfriend and very strict, very religious parents. Accepting his sexuality means he must question not only his identity and his place in the world but his relationship with his girlfriend, his parents, and with God. 

And so begins the battle for Jericho’s soul.


Review:

The Battle for Jericho is about Jericho Jiles’ battle with his sexuality in a well done coming of age and coming out story. Jerry is from a conservative small town and has been raised by devoutly Christian parents. He has always felt the pull towards guys as well as girls but being gay goes against all his beliefs and teachings. There is a lot of religion in this story which creates some hateful situations that adds to Jerry’s struggle or possibly helps him with the struggle. 

Jerry appears to have it all… Loving parents, a beautiful girlfriend, and an awesome best friend Mac Travis. When Dylan Cussler moves into town with his partner and fights for gay adoption the town is thrown into upheaval. Jerry and Mac decide to try their hand at getting Dylan and his partner to leave town. When things don’t go as planned, Jerry’s self-awareness begins to surface. 

Jerry’s friend Hutch is gay and a victim of his parent’s religious beliefs. When Jerry discovers he has feelings for Hutch his internal struggle creates guilt and doubt for him. He begins to ask questions confiding in Dylan for assistance. Dylan provides Jerry guidance and shares his beliefs but encourages Jerry to give himself time to come to his own understanding about who he is. 

All I can say is read or listen to this story. The story is written from Jericho’s perspective and is for the young adult audience. There is no graphic sex but more of a fade to black depiction that is tender and sweet. Jerry is an amazing young man with a generous heart. He feels an attraction to both sexes and has to work through those feelings and come to an understanding about himself. The story presents the opposing sides realistically as is it does with Jerry’s own battle. 

This review is based on the audio book version:
Narrator: Paul Morey
Length: 7 hours & 48 minutes
Narration: Paul Morey’s narration made the story enjoyable and set a good pace. He gives realistic voice to Jerry and the other characters in the story.

July 4th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments