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Review: Malrith’s Shield by Azalea Moone

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Title: Malrith's Shield (Dreamtide, #)
Author: Azalea Moone
Cover Artist: N/A
Publisher: Liquid Silver Books
Reviewer: Monika
Genre: Fantasy & Sci-Fi
Type: Romance
Pairing: Queer
Length: Novel
Heat Rating2 Stars
Book Rating5 Stars (5 / 5)

This book was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review


Blurb:

Forced into exile for being a dragon summoner, Kohaku’s problems only worsen when his dragon becomes inexplicably dormant. In attempt to find the reasons why, he runs into Sawyer, the handsome dragon hunter who freed him from persecution two years ago, and winds up awakening something very different—a love like no other he’s experienced before.

Sawyer’s never forgotten about the gorgeous red-haired summoner. He sets out to prove he’s no longer interested in slaying dragons. Instead, he wants to gain Kohaku’s trust, and his affection, while he helps search for the key in the dragon’s recovery.

However, there’s another frightful magic at play, and suddenly things are starting to fall apart around them. Can they maintain this forbidden love while facing the evils coming their way?


Review:

Malrith’s Shield is a wonderful fantasy about Kohaku, a dragon summoner that has lost his dragon and Sawyer a slayer/hunter who – after meeting Kohaku – no longer hunts dragon summoners. The two run into one another 2 years after the night Sawyer let Kohaku go free and together they search for the reason Kohaku can no longer summon his dragon.

I thought this story was really unique, something I’d never read before. I was completely taken in by these two and their exciting adventure. Kohaku is childlike at times, he’s completely lovable and I loved how totally smitten Sawyer is with him. I couldn’t help but fall in love with them. They are the perfect pairing and the chemistry between them is off the charts. There is a romance but it’s not the focal point of this story.

I thought Maltith’s Shield was a bit of a departure from a lot of fantasies. It has all the elements of your average fantasy a dragon, an adorable fairy, a witch, an evil sorcerer and of course the two perfect main characters. But there is something very different about this book that I can’t quite put my finger on. I wasn’t ready for Kohaku and Sawyer’s adventure to be over, thankfully it’s not, this is the first book in a series.

Azalea Moone has written a truly wonderful fantasy that had me hooked from page one and wouldn’t let me put it down until I’d read ‘the end’. I can’t wait I want more!

I highly recommend this story!

September 4th, 2015|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Speedy Rewards by Jeff Erno

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Title: Speedy Rewards (Working Class, )
Author: Jeff Erno
Cover Artist: Jay Aheer
Publisher: Wayward Ink Publishing
Reviewer: Sean
Genre: Contemporary
Type: Romance
Pairing: Gay, Trans*, & Queer
Length: Novel
Heat Rating5 Stars
Book Rating5 Stars (5 / 5)

This book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review


Blurb:

Phil Mitchell pours his heart and soul into his job as manager of Speedy Mart, a local convenience store. He loves his work and he loves his fellow employees, but when it comes to his personal life, Phil is lonely and depressed and still pining for his long-departed ex.

He embarks upon the week from hell where anything that can go wrong does. It begins with a truck crashing into his outdoor sign and only goes downhill from there.

Add an asshole homophobic boss hell bent on seeing him fired and Phil realizes he needs to put into place a plan to save himself and his job.

First step in his plan… do something about his love life.

Meanwhile, Ezra, one of Phil’s team members, is dealing with his own roller coaster ride of a week.

As is Brandon, the local cop…

And Mark, the homophobic boss…

Perhaps, with a little… luck, the next week will be better.


Review:

This was an easy five-star novel read. When I started it, I simply couldn’t stop. I loved how Jeff Erno set the chapters the way he wanted by showing us who was doing the thinking and acting by mentioning a character’s name as a chapter title. The opening easily hooked me in. I just had to know what happened. The fun and somewhat suck part was after each chapter, it didn’t continue from the previous chapter, but change point of view and location. It worked extremely well for this novel, though!

Phil, the best character of the novel. He was what anyone would call “A Superstar Manager.” He really was. He sacrificed his own life for the sake of his employees’ safety and ensuring the store is in a good place. The first three days were insane and I was really surprised to see Phil handling it all without losing his mind. Especially dealing with homophobic boss! Phil’s heart was broken from his ex as well, but someone showed rather a big interested in him that got me all happy. Phil deserved better, which made me hardly wait for the second book of the series.

Ezra was actually my second favorite character. He was a real character who dealt with a tough life. And yet, he didn’t let anything pull him down as if he was a dust that had been swept under the rug. His heart has been huge, just like Phil. I could see why Phil hired him in the first place despite him being tattooed and wore eyeliners. He would do anything for his best friend as well. He was that special that hold a special place in my heart as I finished the novel.

Mark, an interesting character who had a good reason to be a homophobic. I couldn’t say anything more about Mark because you will need to read the book to find out why I wouldn’t mention it.

The rest of the characters were awesome (of course, there would be some jerk dislikable character in the novel). How could a real life survive without the dislikable person? Jeff Erno made sure his novel was more on the realistic side than being a completely fictional. I wholeheartedly highly recommended you to grab a copy and join for a wild roller coaster ride! It had a lot of ups and downs that kept me reading without stopping. Definitely a five-star read!

June 29th, 2015|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Volunteered to the Future by H.B. Kurtzwilde

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Title: Volunteered to the Future
Author: H.B. Kurtzwilde
Cover Artist: April Martinez
Publisher: Loose ID
Reviewer: Jay
Genre: Fantasy & Sci-Fi
Type: Romance
Pairing: Gay & Queer
Length: Novel
Heat Rating4 Stars
Book Rating3.75 Stars (3.75 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Kourt Crowe, the last remaining Servitor assassin, also a shape-shifter, lives to restore the lost golden age of the Fellowship of Servitors. His first husband died over a century ago, and, since then, he’s been fighting his battles alone. This next battle may be more than he bargained for, as he finds himself head-to-head and body-to-body with a promising, but troubled human student.

Evicted from his college for broken vows, self-described five-star hottie Kato Giovanni isn’t ready to hang up his dreams. With his razor-sharp mind and native genius for theoretical mathematics, he convinces bad-ass Master Kourt to take him on as a student. He wants to learn. Really, he does. But he can’t help testing all of his teacher’s boundaries.


Review:

The world within Volunteered to the Future is detailed and complex. I have to admit this book challenged me to understand what was occurring most of the time. Oh I got the gist of the adventure and was pulled into their world. However, there were times that I just had to keep reading hoping that things would make sense. Being that it required my full attention it was not a story to be read before retiring for the day or as an escape. 

Master Kourt Crowe is a servitor assassin who can shape shift. Following the teachings of his college he teaches Kato Giovanni the lessons he has learned from his masters and teachers. All of this occurs as they fulfill Crowe’s duties as assassin and child collector. You see the colleges obtain children from parents who give them away or sell them to the college. These two differ greatly on their views of love and sexual contact. Kato has no understanding of sexual contact for pleasure while Kourt has lost a husband who he loved deeply.

As time passed, Korut learns that most of Kato’s short comings are due to the lack of talented masters. Patiently Crowe works his way into Kato’s heart and these two begin to build a relationship. Their story is lacking romance and feels for the most part about a person serving their master. That is until Kato begins to enjoy the sexual encounters they share along with the emotions that begin to stir within him. There is a fair amount of internal struggle on Kato’s part because his teachings have not allowed for emotions to play role in one’s life.

If you are looking for romance Volunteered to the Future is not for you. If you enjoy a complex science fiction story you will not be disappointed. While I enjoyed the story I didn’t find this a pleasure to read. It required too much attention and I felt removed from the story at times. With that said the story was well written and the alternate world was well developed. 

October 1st, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: The Picture of Cool by Laurie Boris

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Amazon

Title: The Picture of Cool
Author: Laurie Boris
Cover Artist: Paul Blumstein
Publisher: Self-Published
Reviewer: Kevin
Genre: Contemporary
Type: Romance
Pairing: Bisexual, Gay, Queer, Questioning, & Undecided
Length: Novelette
Heat Rating2 Stars
Book Rating4 Stars (4 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Television producer Charlie Trager spends his days working with beautiful women on a daytime talk show. But underneath his cool façade, there’s a hollow spot in his heart, waiting for the right man to ease his loneliness. Then he meets the show’s next guest, a handsome young politician with a bad case of nerves—and a secret that could turn both their lives upside down.


Review:

The Picture of Cool is a short and the intro of a series. I was going to complain about the sudden ending, but once I went back and learned it was only part one of more, I calmed my “bad ending” rage. I’ll like to start with the cover, I actually liked it. It has a very “90’s era, hotshot in the big city vibe”. As for the story, it’s a gay romance and comes off like a sex in the city episode minus all the shoe shopping. The main characters in this story, Charlie and Adam, actually spend a lot of time working, watching movies, or playing basketball. YES, gay men play sports people. All the side characters filled their role as the witty friend and we even got to go to a gay wedding, how modern of the author. Charlie meets Adam, Charlie and Adam fall for each other, Adam’s a lot more complex…as in he has a wife and some babies to feed. The writing is good; I think the plot needs a bit more to make it stand out. They both have amazing jobs, so I would try adding some more workplace drama to add something different to go along with the romantics. 

July 25th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Big Damn Heroines by Various Authors

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Title: Big Damn Heroines
Author: Neal Litherland, Megan Dorei, Michael Barnette, and Layla M. Wier
Cover Artist: Lou Harper
Publisher: Storm Moon Press
Reviewer: Kevin
Genre: Fantasy & Sci-Fi
Type: Non-Romance
Pairing: Lesbian & Queer
Length: Novel
Heat Rating3 Stars
Book Rating4 Stars (4 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Big Damn Heroines is a celebration of the plus-sized woman. Specifically, the plus-sized woman kicking ass. The media perception of the strong female protagonist is almost invariably thin, but powerful women come in all shapes and sizes, and it’s time that they had a chance to stand up and be recognized. The four stories in this anthology show that bigger women can be more than comic relief or the dumpy best friend. They can be a force to be reckoned with all on their own. 

“Machine Gun” Mercy is a member of the Valkyries, an all-female squad of Roughnecks patrolling the outer solar system. When a distress call comes in from the penal colony on Titan, Mercy and the Valkyries descend to confront the Terror on Saturn VI. Porter has followed the career of vigilante superhero Firebird with great interest, if only because Firebird is actually Blaise, once her dearest friend. Firebird seems to be self-destructing, though, and though Porter tries to ignore it, she finds herself drawn into the Folie à Deux, a shared madness that threatens to swallow them both. The widening Distance of Memory following the recent death of their fourth member has left surviving bondmates Zaezon, Margellian, and Corynteea lost and uncertain. But when they come across evidence of a band of Renders attacking villages, they must find their way together as three in order to complete their mission. Finally, Cat, a Finder gifted with the ability to locate objects and people with preternatural ease, is contacted by former lover Mirsagh to help track down a merchant’s son. As they follow the man’s trail, old feelings—good and bad—resurface, and Cat is faced with the choice to let Mirsagh be the Finder’s Keeper again.


Review:

Terror on Saturn VI – Neal Litherland 

We’re introduced to Mercy who happens to have a bum leg. Immediately, we get to witness some technology of the world, a machine that can repair humans. And we also get introduced to Mercy’s witty tough girl attitude. We are introduced to other characters who are on this futuristic type SWAT team with Mercy. The characters had simple names that didn’t leave me confused: Cross, Voodoo, Boom Boom, for example. We get to go on a mission with this crew into a prison experiencing some…um…deathly technical difficulties. Once inside the prison we meet Roderick, who sort of explains what’s been going inside the prison that has this creepy mysterious “we’re all going to die” vibe going on. The author does a good job handling the action scenes and describing how the enemies Mercy and the gang face look and even move. This short had a very Super Troopers feel to it, but overall it was well written. 

Folie a Deux – Megan Dorei

In this short we’re introduced to Blaise and Porter. Based on the definition we’re treated to, I’m easily interested in this short. I’ve mentioned this often since I started doing reviews, but I loathe dream sequences or endless nightmares in books. Based on the definition at the start, I went into this short wanting it to be like the movie Bug. This was well written, but not as interesting as the first short. I found myself skimming through this one waiting for the big twist honestly. 

Distance Memory – Michael Barnette

Alright, now this short and the one written by Michael. The plot was sort of similar, a group heading into a location to solve the dark mystery. Unlike Michael’s book, the characters in this book had names that I didn’t even try to pronounce in my head. This short was equally as well written as Neal’s also. While the first short featured a lot of gun action, magic was used in this one. In my opinion, Michael’s characters were the most entertaining so far out of the shorts I’ve read. 

Finder’s Keeper – Layla M. Wier 

It didn’t take me long to like the setting of this short and the characters, Cat and Mirsagh. I love crappy apartments, not living in them, but it makes the story connectable for me since my first apartment was just horrible. Anyways, Cat requests the help of Mirsagh, who has some cool abilities, to track down and find a missing boy named Azar. This short matches the mood of Michael’s and Neal’s, it was dark, and like a better version of Law and Order honestly. This short also included the most sexual tension. 

Overall –

Three of these four shorts kept me entertained, but I wasn’t begging for more once I was done. I think Megan’s book wasn’t as dark as the other three, which made it the odd man…or woman out.

June 5th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: The Seventh Pleiade by Andrew J. Peters

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Title: The Seventh Pleiade
Author: Andrew J. Peters
Cover Artist: Sheri
Publisher: Bold Strokes Books
Reviewer: Kevin
Genre: Contemporary
Type: Non-Romance
Pairing: Bisexual, Gay, Heterosexual, & Queer
Length: Novel
Heat Rating2 Stars
Book Rating4.75 Stars (4.75 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Atlantis is besieged by violent storms, tremors, and a barbarian army. For sixteen-year-old Aerander, it’s a calamitous backdrop to his Panegyris, where boys are feted for their passage to manhood.

Amid a secret web of romances among the celebrants, Aerander’s cousin Dam goes missing with two boys. With the kingdom in crisis, no one suspects the High Priest Zazamoukh, though Aerander uncovers a conspiracy to barter boys for dark spiritual power. Aerander’s proof— an underground vault that disappears in the morning—brings shame on his family and charges of lunacy. The only way for Aerander to regain his honor is to prove what really happened to the missing boys.

Tracking Dam leads Aerander on a terrifying and fantastical journey. He spots a star that hasn’t been seen for centuries. He uncovers a legend about an ancient race of men who hid below the earth. And traveling to an underground world, he learns about matters even more urgent than the missing boys. The world aboveground is changing, and he will have to clear a path for the kingdom’s survival. 


Review:

I experienced the joy of reading The Seventh Pleiade by Andrew J Peters. It was another book that took me out of my comfort zone that included a lot of Greek mythology. I have little interest in Greek mythology, but the author made it interesting enough for me to read his work from start to finish.

As for the plot, Aerander’s cousin Dam goes missing with two boys. From the very first line of this book we’re tossed into that storyline and also introduced to the main characters and members of his family. I liked his young step mother and the dialog they shared throughout the book. At some points they bickered like siblings, while in other scenes she acted as a motherly figure giving him advice.

Back to the main plot, the mystery isn’t as black and white as described. The author writes it in a way that we start to question whether or not Dam was kidnapped or simply the kidnapper. The characters aren’t as black and white either. Cal, Aera’s lover, for example transforms early in the story. And also another character named Lys turns out to play an interesting role.

When it comes to sexuality in the book, male on male relationships are common but some fathers prefer their sons to eventually end up with women. And the very few sex scenes and sexual situations in the book are handled in a classy way. I believe most of the main male characters were teens, so the author had no choice but to keep the sex as PG-13 as he could.

I had no issues when it came to grammar or the story structure. The author uses a lot of his own vocabulary throughout the book. He included definitions at the end of the book for the vocabulary words, but the majority were self-explanatory based on the context of the sentence they appeared in.

The missing boys plot is just one of the many engaging plots in the book. There’s also a war taking place, the discussion of crazy sacrificial ritual being brought back, and many more subplots that keeps each chapter feeling fresh. The big discovery at the start of Part Two of the book twists up the plot majorly. I didn’t have one “roll of the eyes” moment while reading this book, well maybe one part when Lys kind of abandoned his character and tried to get frisky.

Overall, nice read. It can easily be a four star story because of the way it was split into parts, but I’m sure the author originally wrote these as a series of shorts. If you’re into Greek mythology you’ll love this, but if you’re not, if you ever get free time, give the first few chapters a glance.

May 20th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Prisoner (Kria, #1) by Megan Derr

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Title: Prisoner (Kria, #1)
Author: Megan Derr
Cover Artist: London Burden
Publisher: Less Than Three Press
Reviewer: Sean
Genre: Fantasy & Sci-Fi
Type: Non-Romance
Pairing: Gay, Heterosexual, & Queer
Length: Long Novel
Heat Rating1 Stars
Book Rating5 Stars (5 / 5)

 


Blurb:

A man whom all men fear…

General Dieter von Adolwulf has led the Scarlet Army of Kria to victory for the past decade, holding the infamous field known as the Regenbogen against Kria’s hated enemies—the deceptive Illussor and the ruthless Salharans. War has waged between the three nations for longer than anyone can remember, but no one has held the Regenbogen as well as the notorious Wolf of Kria and his fearsome army.

A man who fears nothing…

Returning home at the end of the year, the Scarlet Army is attacked in the dead of night by a single man who manages to kill hundreds before he is finally captured. A Salharan soldier with no name, no purpose but to kill, he refuses to bend to the Wolf who takes him prisoner and forces upon him a despicable Krian name.

A man with nothing to lose…

When the rest of his army is slaughtered by Illussor soldiers desperately seeking his prisoner, Dieter determines to hold fast—both for answers and in revenge for the men he lost. But answers and revenge are hard to come by when surrounded by secrets and treachery, and the man least likely to kill him is the prisoner who most wants him dead.


Review:

Prisoner book one of Kria had to be one of the best fantasy books I’d read in like forever. The world the author had build was so awesome and realistic. I felt like I was there in that world and see what was happening around me. I could easily see how devoted the author put their passion into Prisoner. I was positive she actually drew a map of the world she created in the book somewhere in her office. The book pretty much had everything to make a book a whole. Character developments were there and well developed, too. It was quite a long read but I was able to enjoy taking my time and savor page after page. 

Throughout the book, I found myself more curious about a specific character named Iah. I didn’t think we got enough details about him except he’d gone through horrible and managed to find his happy ending with another wonderful character. General Dieter von Adolwulf had to be one of the most interesting characters out of all characters that was mentioned in the book. I kept wondering if he’d turn into a wolf since it was his nickname that was known far away from his own home. Dieter’s prisoner was a hilarious character. I loved when he screamed Stars Refuse You!. It made me chuckle every time I read. He loved saying Stars for like a million times. While Dieter used Princess of Winter for his cursing, which was funny as well. I loved the language the author chose to write for the characters’ dialogues. 

I loved Iah’s sister because she was a strong woman, a woman that no one should think twice to mess around with her. She was smart and tough. She knew what she was asking for and what she demanded. All in all, she was an awesome character. 

Now you see how often I typed about the characters? Megan Derr wrote them so extremely well and I was able to connect to a bunch of them. We had gotten three pairings happening in the book. I truly wished there were fourth pairings for a specific person and his name was Kalan. I adored him. It was harder to choose which one would be my number one favorite character because I adored them all. Except the bad people, of course. They were developed well also. 

Now, the plots, WOW. That one word pretty much summed it all up. The book focused solely on the plots rather than man meet man and then they bedded together. So boring, but in the Prisoner, that didn’t happen. It started with a man met man, battling and knowing each other until the near ending of the book, something happened. There were a lot of magic and war going on in the book that kept me entertained. It wasn’t a romance book nor was it a m/m romance book. It was simply a high fantasy book where sexual orientation didn’t matter.

In additional to a wonderful, well-developed story, it wasn’t complicated at all. I was able to understand from the beginning to the ending. I loved it. I didn’t have to research online while reading to ensure I understood what the author was trying to get across. It was that good. It wasn’t necessary a quick read, though, but nevertheless an excellent read. I’m looking forward to start the second book, even though it was a tad longer than this book. Approximately seventy-five thousand words more than the first book. 

I highly recommended you to check this book out and you wouldn’t be disappointed with the amazing world the author created, the amazing characters the author developed, and the amazing plots the author provided.

May 19th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Looking After Joey by David Pratt

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Title: Looking After Joey
Author: David Pratt
Cover Artist: Wilde City Press
Publisher: Wilde City Press
Reviewer: Jay
Genre: Contemporary
Type: Non-Romance
Pairing: Gay & Queer
Length: Novel
Heat Rating4 Stars
Book Rating2 Stars (2 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Wouldn’t it be great if a porn character stepped out of the TV, into your life? Well, be careful what you wish for. Because that’s how Calvin and Peachy end up looking after Joey. And teaching him everything he needs to know to be be a gay man in New York City. His final exam? A fabulous Labor Day party on Fire Island. But first, they all have to get invited. This will involve a rogues’ gallery of eccentric Manhattanites, including portly, perspiring publicist Bunce van den Troell; theatrical investor Sir Desmond Norma; studly thespian Clive Tidwell-Smidgin; lubricant king Fred Pflester; and a mysterious young man named Jeffrey. Tender, wise, witty and often utterly deranged, Looking After Joey will make you wish that you, too, had a porn character at your kitchen table asking, “So, when can I have sex?”


Review:

Calvin Hodge is an accountant living in New York City. He and his best friend Peachy (Leland) are portrayed as your typical Judy loving gay men. Calvin is unattached and turns to a ritual of porn viewing as a substitute. Peachy’s platonic friendship is a big part of Calvin’s life but he doesn’t seem to have much more going for him at the moment. 

During one of Calvin’s porn viewing sessions he is sucked into the world of his porn star obsession Joey Rhodes. Here all the guys’ girlfriends are away and they release the sexual tension with each other via all the cliché porn scenes. Calvin returns to the real world and Joey follows him back. Calvin and Peachy educate Joey on reality through a series of lessons designed to educate the gay man.

The story is broken in to five parts and switches the point of view throughout the story. I got the impression that these parts tied together somewhat but they felt more like sub stories within the overall story, if that makes any sense. This is not a romance but about discovery where the main characters learn a lot about themselves and each other. The friendship and caring that forms between the main characters works really well. However, all the older supporting gay men appear to have issues and gave the impression that gays are not adjusted individuals.

This story is one that will either grab you or leave you behind. I fall in the latter category where this didn’t work for me. It took me several weeks and sheer determination to complete reading this. I just could not connect with the characters and the time spent educating Joey on the real world just dragged by. The details surround gay history and its icons was well done but the combination of fiction and non-fiction didn’t mix well for me.

May 15th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Deep Dish by Marc Harshbarger

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Title: Deep Dish
Author: Marc Harshbarger
Cover Artist: Wilde City Press
Publisher: Wilde City Press
Reviewer: Jay
Genre: Historical
Type: Romance
Pairing: Queer, Questioning, Undecided, Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, & Heterosexual
Length: Novel
Heat Rating3 Stars
Book Rating3.75 Stars (3.75 / 5)

 


Blurb:

When teenager Cary Davenport agrees to take his mother’s poodle for a walk late one summer night, he never expects to end up gazing upon the gorgeous Chandler Haze (the star quarterback of the Winnetka Wildcats, homecoming king and an object of desire for many), who suddenly appears from Lake Michigan to stand glistening in all his naked glory on the beach.

And with this opening scene, we are transported back to that groovy yesteryear of 1975 to meet various families, friends and other strangers, whose lives become dramatically intertwined as they dance to The Hustle, worship Mary Richards, wear mood rings and own pet rocks during their search for love and happiness—or at the very least a one-night stand of incredible sex.

This is the world of Deep Dish, a dark comic soap opera where sordid secrets are kept by almost everyone.


Review:

Deep Dish by Marc Harshbarger is reminiscent of the night time soaps Dynasty, Dallas, and Knots Landing with the spin of Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City. The story has it all: cheating wives & husbands, scheming villains & villainesses, righteous women, oblivious hunks, inebriated men and women, jealously, fabulous drag Queens, and a bit of incest. It is full of secrets, deceit, lies, love and hate. The spin of course is which of these characters are gay, questioning, or actually straight. Well as it turns out a good number of the 40+ characters are. Some openly, some closeted, and some just discovering it. Everywhere we turn there is sexual tension and drama.

The story set in the mid 1970’s centers around the marriage of Helen Davenport and Howard Haze. Well things go seriously out of control from the start. The sexscapades, raunchy humor, twists and turns all make this a roller-coaster ride of fun. All the guys seem to have abnormally large appendages and most are not shy about giving you a peek (or feel). Even while in a coma the sheet is tented like the big top at a circus.

It is hard to say who the main characters were since there were so many characters. I myself focused on Chandler Haze and Matt Mahoney’s story but there are so many other outstanding characters as well. The story keeps switching between the different story lines with a header telling you where you are now. See… just like watching one of nighttime soaps. The story all happens in the course of a few days with parallel plots occurring. The biggest issue I had was keeping track of who’s who. There is a cast of characters in the front of the print copy but the page is blank in the ebook version. So being google capable I am I found the cast of characters to help me out. 

If you are looking for a sexually infused romp through yesteryear then gab a copy and enjoy. The characters are multi-dimensional and expertly written. However, while the story flows quickly it reads different than usual and the story just like those on TV leaves you hanging. I almost gave up on this story and I am so glad I hung in there. I am now hooked and anxiously looking forward to reading deeper dish the continuation.

April 28th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments

Review: Nganga by Damien D’Enfer

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Amazon

Title: Nganga
Author: Damien D’Enfer
Cover Artist: N/A
Publisher: Self-Published
Reviewer: Sean
Genre: Horror
Type: Non-Romance
Pairing: Gay
Length: Short
Heat Rating3 Stars
Book Rating5 Stars (5 / 5)

 


Blurb:

Jacksonville Detective Fletch Boatwright’s life sucks. It’s not easy being a white cop in an increasingly colorful world. Fletch has a chip on his shoulder as big as the space shuttle, pops pills like tic tacs and is so unpopular that his own wife and kids hate him. When he shoots and kills an unarmed Afro-Cuban boy and gets transferred down to Miami, his life goes from bad to worse.

Someone’s slaughtering the priests of Santeria, and Boatwright’s hunt for the killer leads him into Miami’s underworld of, in his words, ‘hoodoo and voodoo from every f*cking banana republic in the world.” Before he knows it he is being hunted by the spirit of dead murderer hell-bent on a particularly vicious brand of sadistic and psychosexual revenge.


Review:

For something that was so short, the author really did well with this one. I believe it was one of the author’s first works and it most certainly wouldn’t be my last with his work. I’ve enjoyed the story from the beginning to the ending. As far as I could tell, the author inspired his story toward the true story crime that happened back in 2013 where a unharmed teenager boy was shot dead from a police officer. This book was a straight-on revenge to cop for what he had done to an innocent teenager.

I loved the fact that author chose a black magic to be a horror element in the story. It worked perfectly for a short horror story. The horror part was actually detailed so it may not be for those who couldn’t stand anything that related with death, blood, murder or worse. For those who happened to have a tough heart, do pick this one up! It was a thrill read. Can’t wait to see what the author will write next.

January 27th, 2014|Categories: Review|0 Comments